Extended for 2021 CARES Act Tax Benefits

IR-2021-190, September 17, 2021


https://www.irs.gov/newsroom/expanded-tax-benefits-help-individuals-and-businesses-give-to-charity-during-2021-deductions-up-to-600-available-for-cash-donations-by-non-itemizers


WASHINGTON — The Internal Revenue Service today explained how expanded tax benefits can help both individuals and businesses give to charity before the end of this year.


The Taxpayer Certainty and Disaster Tax Relief Act of 2020, enacted last December, provides several provisions to help individuals and businesses who give to charity. The new law generally extends through the end of 2021 four temporary tax changes originally enacted by the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act. Here is a rundown of these changes.


Deduction for individuals who don't itemize; cash donations up to $600 qualify


Ordinarily, individuals who elect to take the standard deduction cannot claim a deduction for their charitable contributions. The law now permits these individuals to claim a limited deduction on their 2021 federal income tax returns for cash contributions made to certain qualifying charitable organizations. Nearly nine in 10 taxpayers now take the standard deduction and could potentially qualify to claim a limited deduction for cash contributions.

These individuals, including married individuals filing separate returns, can claim a deduction of up to $300 for cash contributions made to qualifying charities during 2021. The maximum deduction is increased to $600 for married individuals filing joint returns.


Cash contributions to most charitable organizations qualify. However, cash contributions made either to supporting organizations or to establish or maintain a donor advised fund do not qualify. Cash contributions carried forward from prior years do not qualify, nor do cash contributions to most private foundations and most cash contributions to charitable remainder trusts. In general, a donor-advised fund is a fund or account maintained by a charity in which a donor can, because of being a donor, advise the fund on how to distribute or invest amounts contributed by the donor and held in the fund. A supporting organization is a charity that carries out its exempt purposes by supporting other exempt organizations, usually other public charities. See Publication 526, Charitable Contributions for more information on the types of organizations that qualify.


Cash contributions include those made by check, credit card or debit card as well as amounts incurred by an individual for unreimbursed out-of-pocket expenses in connection with the individual's volunteer services to a qualifying charitable organization. Cash contributions don't include the value of volunteer services, securities, household items or other property.


100% limit on eligible cash contributions made by itemizers in 2021


Subject to certain limits, individuals who itemize may generally claim a deduction for charitable contributions made to qualifying charitable organizations. These limits typically range from 20% to 60% of adjusted gross income (AGI) and vary by the type of contribution and type of charitable organization. For example, a cash contribution made by an individual to a qualifying public charity is generally limited to 60% of the individual's AGI. Excess contributions may be carried forward for up to five tax years.


The law now permits electing individuals to apply an increased limit ("Increased Individual Limit"), up to 100% of their AGI, for qualified contributions made during calendar-year 2021. Qualified contributions are contributions made in cash to qualifying charitable organizations.

As with the new limited deduction for nonitemizers, cash contributions to most charitable organizations qualify, but, cash contributions made either to supporting organizations or to establish or maintain a donor advised fund, do not. Nor do cash contributions to private foundations and most cash contributions to charitable remainder trusts unless an individual makes the election for any given qualified cash contribution, the usual percentage limit applies. Keep in mind that an individual's other allowed charitable contribution deductions reduce the maximum amount allowed under this election. Eligible individuals must make their elections with their 2021 Form 1040 or Form 1040-SR.


Corporate limit increased to 25% of taxable income


The law now permits C corporations to apply an increased limit (Increased Corporate Limit) of 25% of taxable income for charitable contributions of cash they make to eligible charities during calendar-year 2021. Normally, the maximum allowable deduction is limited to 10% of a corporation's taxable income.


Again, the Increased Corporate Limit does not automatically apply. C corporations must elect the Increased Corporate Limit on a contribution-by-contribution basis.


Making Your Tax Deductible Contribution



To make our healing and learning non profit activities possible for veterans, youth, and children and adults with health complications, we rely on gifts from the generous people in our community.

If you're able to be generous this season of giving, your gift to Ride On St. Louis will be matched up to $20k, thanks to an anonymous supporter. If your values, hopes and heart resonate with our mission to serve, please consider making your gift now. If you've already given, thank you from the bottom of our hearts. Please consider giving again now to take full advantage of both these giving incentives for 2021.


Make your 2021 gift now at rideonstl.org/match




The information on this website is not intended as legal or tax advice. For such advice, please consult an attorney or tax advisor.

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